Children and adults with special health care needs are more likely to have poorer oral hygiene, increased prevalence of periodontal disease, higher rates of tooth loss, and increased untreated dental caries (i.e., cavities) than the general population. Poor oral health is linked to several health conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and other cardiovascular, endocrine, and respiratory diseases. Oral pain can interfere with the functions of daily living, including eating, which, in turn, affects diet and nutrition, sleeping, and conversing. Oral disease and dysfunction result in low self-esteem, alter speech, and affect social interactions, appearance, and behavior—all of which are vitally important for children and adults with disabilities. Since a significant proportion of children and adults with disabilities may not be able to verbalize how the disease affects them, regular access to dental services and delivery of comprehensive oral health services are vital for them. Many dentists do not treat patients with IDD, particularly adults, because they feel unprepared or inexperienced in treating adults with IDD. Interviews with families conducted for the NJCDD 5-year plan confirmed that they had difficulty finding dentists who were trained to treat people with IDD. Interviews with families conducted for the NJCDD 5-year plan confirmed that they had difficulty finding dentists who were trained to treat people with IDD.